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Archive for the ‘programming’ Category

django send email

September 3rd, 2013

Mail is sent using the SMTP host and port specified in the EMAIL_HOST and EMAIL_PORT settings. The EMAIL_HOST_USER and EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD settings, if set, are used to authenticate to the SMTP server, and the EMAIL_USE_TLS and EMAIL_USE_SSL settings control whether a secure connection is used.

add this code to setting.py as your email account

ALLOWED_HOSTS = []
EMAIL_USE_TLS = True
EMAIL_HOST = ‘smtp.example.com’
EMAIL_HOST_USER = ‘test@example.com’
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = r’example’
EMAIL_PORT = 587
DEFAULT_FROM_EMAIL = ‘My Company ‘
SERVER_EMAIL = ‘webmas…@example.com’

views.py

from django.template.loader import render_to_string

def send_email(request):
    message = render_to_string(email.html)

    send_mail('Subject here', message, 'from@example.com',
    ['to@example.com'], fail_silently=False)

reference: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/email/

Author: Richard Amodia Categories: programming Tags:

django create Function to delete all session

August 23rd, 2013

definition: session stores data on the server side and abstracts the sending and receiving of cookies, Delete the current session data from the session and regenerate the session key value that is sent back to the user in the cookie.

purpose: This is used if you want to ensure that the previous session data can’t be accessed again from the user’s browser.

views.py

def delete_session(request):
    # session to be deleted
    session = request.session
    del session['session1']
    del session['session2']
    del session['session3']
    del session['session4']
    del session['session5']

*use the “”delete_session(request)”" Function name to delete session.

*I have an example below on how to use the created delete_session function.

def final_session(request):
    # function name
    delete_session(request)

    template = 'final_session.html'
    context = {}
    return render(request, template, context)
Author: Richard Amodia Categories: programming Tags:

Mercurial GUI Client on Ubuntu

April 15th, 2010

There are a lot of options for a Mercurial GUI client on Ubuntu but I preferred to use TortoiseHg so that I could use it with Nautilus – Ubuntu’s file manager.

TortoiseHg however is not in the Ubuntu Karmic Koala repositories.  Another challenge is that TortoiseHg 1.0.1 requires Mercurial 1.5 but Ubuntu Karmic only has Mercurial 1.3 on the repositories.  Of course I want the newer versions. :)

Here are the steps I did to install TortoiseHg, my preferred Mercurial GUI client on Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10:
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Fix for JPEG upload problem in Django in virtualenv

December 2nd, 2009

I have been busy modifying Django‘s models for a project to include a field for uploading an image and was testing the model using Django’s Admin interface when I suddenly got this error:

Upload a valid image. The file you uploaded was either not an image or a corrupted image.

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Author: Cyril Pauya Categories: programming Tags: , , , , ,

Django in Production

October 20th, 2009

Here are some quick tips when moving your Django site into production.
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Author: Cyril Pauya Categories: Software, programming Tags: ,

Use multiple Django versions for development

September 23rd, 2009

To use multiple Django versions for development, you will need virtualenv. Virtualenv is a sandbox that allows you to use different versions of Python in your development machine.  It is a tool to create isolated Python environments.

I have been using Django 1.1 beta on my projects.  Just recently, I needed to use Django 1.0 for a new project.  Of course there were major differences from Django 1.0 versus Django 1.1 which could cause headaches.

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Author: Cyril Pauya Categories: programming Tags: , , ,